Why Russia should not win the bid for Bolivia’s lithium (commentary) | Por qué Rusia no debería ganar la licitación por el litio de Bolivia (comentario)

Mongabay:

Commentary by Joseph Bouchard on 7 June 2022

  • The government of Bolivia is currently negotiating with various foreign companies from countries including Argentina, the United States, China, and Russia, for the handling of its lithium extraction.
  • Results of the bidding process should be announced within the next two weeks. A top contender is Russia: Moscow-based Uranium One Group has offered to extract Bolivia’s lithium reserves, operated by state-owned energy and mining giant Rosatom.
  • Joseph Bouchard, a Canadian analyst focusing on geopolitics and security in Latin America, argues that Bolivia should not accept the Russian bid.
  • This article is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily of Mongabay.

The Arce government is currently negotiating with various foreign companies from countries including Argentina, the United States, China, and Russia, for the handling of its lithium extraction. The bidding war comes after long-fought efforts by the Bolivian government to extract the country’s lithium resources.

Results of the bidding process should be announced within the next two weeks. A top contender is Russia. Moscow-based Uranium One Group has offered to extract Bolivia’s lithium reserves, operated by state-owned energy and mining giant Rosatom.

The bid is wrapped in controversy given Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine. Energy and mining firms like Uranium One/Rosatom have a stake in the invasion, as they have moved quickly into Ukrainian territory to secure natural resources and extraction-conversion plants.

Finland has already canceled its nuclear-energy deal with Uranium One/Rosatom over the invasion. Bolivia should follow suit and not move forward with the Uranium One/Rosatom bid for its lithium.

Were the Arce government to accept the Russian bid, Bolivia would promptly become a pariah state on the regional and international stage.

Countries all over the globe, most prominently in the Western hemisphere, have put sanctions on the Putin regime and have ceased trade and commercial dealings with Russia. Included within this are energy deals, as many Western countries have canceled natural resource extraction and trade agreements with Russia since February, including Germany, Canada, and the United States.

Salinas Grandes on Argentina Andes is a salt desert in the Jujuy Province. Photo credit: Ksenia Ragozina / licensed via Shutterstock.
Lithium mine at Salinas Grandes salt desert Jujuy province, Argentina. Photo credit: Ksenia Ragozina / licensed via Shutterstock.

Countries that have continued to engage commercially with Russian state-owned firms and the Russian regime have been roundly condemned by the most powerful members of the international community.

Let us take Pakistan as an example. In a New York Times report circulated in late February, it was found that the Khan government met with the Putin regime to secure an energy deal, namely an oil pipeline, between Russia and Pakistan.

The rumored deal was met with widespread condemnation from NATO members, human rights activists, security analysts, and others, forcing the deal to practically die in the water.

A similar fate awaits Bolivia if it decides to move forward with this deal. Bolivia would find itself isolated from many key partners in Latin America and the West, which it relies on for much of its economic prosperity and human development.

Bolivia would also be threatened by sanctions over tacitly supporting the war in Ukraine through the deal, as Russia and its financial backers have received extensive and crippling sanctions.

Moreover, the bid could have negative repercussions for Bolivia’s role in the fight against climate change. Russia has lower environmental standards and regulations for its companies. Where Russia has handled energy resources, environmental incidents have been commonplace.

Bolivia, especially under the leadership of Evo Morales and now Luis Arce, has attempted to position itself as a champion of indigenous and environmental rights. The rhetoric around the lithium mining bidding war has been similar, with the Arce government repeatedly citing the importance of lithium in the transition towards renewable energy futures in public.

Were Russia to handle the extraction of Bolivia’s lithium resources, lower standards and regulations could result in environmental disaster. The technology surrounding the extraction of lithium remains fragile, and Bolivia should not cut corners by choosing Uranium One/Rosatom.

Despite the lower financial cost it might offer, the bid could potentially bring catastrophic environmental costs in the longer term.

Lithium evaporation ponds in Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Image by NASA. Image processing by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay

There are other geopolitical risks associated with the bid, as well. In the past, Russia has not shied away from using energy and mining assets around the world to assert its geopolitical dominance.

Specifically, Russia has threatened to cut or fully cut energy supplies and commercial activities as a way to exert pressure on non-compliant states.

In the run-up to the invasion of Ukraine, Russia had cut energy supplies – including electricity – to some Eastern European states as a show of force against NATO and to threaten those states into compliance. Russia also cut natural gas flows to Finland in May after Finland pulled out of the nuclear energy deal.

If Bolivia accepts Russia’s bid, the Arce government runs the high risk of Russia using its extraction infrastructure as a pawn in a geopolitical game over hegemony in Latin America. Such a risk becomes greater as the great powers – namely the United States, China, and Russia, increase geopolitical competition in Latin America and throughout the Global South.

Most Bolivians would also not see the benefits of this deal. Russia is a kleptocratic state, where company CEOs, most prominently in the energy, mining, and military sector, are appointed to key formal and informal posts in government.

The government has a direct stake in these companies, and government figures benefit from state-run commercial enterprises like Uranium One/Rosatom.

Vladimir Putin and his cronies in the Kremlin would be the main benefactors of this deal, not the Bolivian people. The project would mainly employ Russians, not Bolivians, and would, in practice, be run directly by the Kremlin.

Russia’s energy and mining projects around the world bring little economic activity to the local communities they impact. Instead, they serve as the pet projects and money makers of the elite in the halls of power in Moscow, furthering the gap between the poor and the powerful in Russia.

This potential lithium deal with Russia would threaten the future of Bolivian democracy and human rights. Bolivia’s democracy is a fragile one.

In 2019, the country suffered a political crisis marked by a de facto coup orchestrated by right-wing Interim President Jeanine Añez. [Bolivian Thoughts opinion: This is major mistake in the author of this commentary/article. International multilateral organizations like UN, OAS, EU and countries like Colombia, USA, have not only recognized President’s Anez appointment as a constitutional government, as a result of the former president fled the country, on charges of electoral fraud, as seen and reported by the OAS observers of the 2019 election. The former president, a populist backed by illegal coca leaf growers, seeked asylum in Mexico and later in Argentina.] Fortunately, the 2020 elections brought a peaceful transition of power and a return to constitutional and democratic rule. [Bolivian Thoughts opinion: Which was only made possible by President’s Anez government.]

Yet, Bolivia’s history has been marked by a decades-long struggle between democracy and authoritarian rule by the country’s economic, political, and military elite.

Russia, itself a kleptocratic authoritarian state that disrupts liberal-democratic institutions and processes globally, has already disrupted Bolivian democracy, as well.

During the Cold War, Russia backed authoritarian-Communist rebel groups in Bolivia and broader Latin America. Most recently, Russia has sent weapons to authoritarian regimes and illicit armed groups, including the regimes in Cuba and Venezuela.

Were Russia to win this deal, it would have significantly more leverage, influence, and power over governance and human rights in Bolivia, as it would control the country’s most important natural resource. It could, then, threaten Bolivian democracy from within.

Such a risk is not worth taking, especially given the decrepit state of global democracy.

Lithium evaporation ponds in Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Source: NASA. Image processing by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay
Lithium evaporation ponds in Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Source: NASA. Image processing by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay

Safe to say, there are various uncertainties associated with the deal. Risks to democracy, human rights, environmental protections, and national-regional stability should be taken seriously.

Those risks could themselves be dangerous for Bolivia, scaring off economic investment in adjacent commercial sectors. It would, therefore, be in the best interest of the Bolivian government and its people not to pursue the lithium deal with Russia.

Instead, it should invest in an option that helps make Bolivia safer, freer, more prosperous, and greener, without providing undue amounts of influence to a geopolitically-ambitious great power like Russia, which is itself submerged by scandals and violations of the very values the Bolivian state should stand for.

Joseph Bouchard is a Canadian analyst focusing on geopolitics and security in Latin America. Based in Bogotá, he has previously written for The Diplomat, NATO, Spheres of Influence, and the City Paper Bogotá. He also serves as a Researcher with the Climate Security Program at the Igarapé Institute in Rio de Janeiro, and a Master of International Affairs candidate at the Bush School of Government at Texas A&M University.

https://news.mongabay.com/2022/06/why-russia-should-not-win-the-bid-for-bolivias-lithium-commentary/

Comentario de Joseph Bouchard el 7 de junio de 2022

  • Actualmente, el gobierno de Bolivia está negociando con varias empresas extranjeras de países como Argentina, Estados Unidos, China y Rusia, para el manejo de su extracción de litio.
  • Los resultados del proceso de licitación deberían anunciarse dentro de las próximas dos semanas. Uno de los principales contendientes es Rusia: Uranium One Group, con sede en Moscú, se ha ofrecido a extraer las reservas de litio de Bolivia, operadas por el gigante estatal de energía y minería Rosatom.
  • Joseph Bouchard, un analista canadiense que se enfoca en geopolítica y seguridad en América Latina, argumenta que Bolivia no debería aceptar la oferta rusa.
  • Este artículo es un comentario. Las opiniones expresadas son las del autor, no necesariamente de Mongabay.

Actualmente, el gobierno de Arce está negociando con varias empresas extranjeras de países como Argentina, Estados Unidos, China y Rusia, para el manejo de su extracción de litio. La guerra de ofertas se produce después de los prolongados esfuerzos del gobierno boliviano para extraer los recursos de litio del país.

Los resultados del proceso de licitación deberían anunciarse dentro de las próximas dos semanas. Un contendiente principal es Rusia. Uranium One Group, con sede en Moscú, se ha ofrecido a extraer las reservas de litio de Bolivia, operadas por el gigante estatal de energía y minería Rosatom.

La oferta está envuelta en controversia dada la invasión en curso de Rusia a Ucrania. Las empresas de energía y minería como Uranium One/Rosatom tienen interés en la invasión, ya que se trasladaron rápidamente al territorio ucraniano para asegurar los recursos naturales y las plantas de extracción y conversión.

Finlandia ya canceló su acuerdo de energía nuclear con Uranium One/Rosatom por la invasión. Bolivia debería hacer lo mismo y no seguir adelante con la oferta de Uranium One/Rosatom por su litio.

Si el gobierno de Arce aceptara la oferta rusa, Bolivia se convertiría rápidamente en un estado paria en el escenario regional e internacional.

Países de todo el mundo, sobre todo en el hemisferio occidental, impusieron sanciones al régimen de Putin y cesaron los tratos comerciales y comerciales con Rusia. Dentro de esto se incluyen los acuerdos energéticos, ya que muchos países occidentales han cancelado la extracción de recursos naturales y los acuerdos comerciales con Rusia desde febrero, incluidos Alemania, Canadá y Estados Unidos.

Salinas Grandes on Argentina Andes is a salt desert in the Jujuy Province. Photo credit: Ksenia Ragozina / licensed via Shutterstock.
Salinas Grandes en Argentina Andes es un desierto de sal en la provincia de Jujuy. Crédito de la foto: Ksenia Ragozina / con licencia a través de Shutterstock.

Los países que han seguido participando comercialmente con empresas estatales rusas y el régimen ruso han sido condenados rotundamente por los miembros más poderosos de la comunidad internacional.

Tomemos a Pakistán como ejemplo. En un informe del New York Times que circuló a fines de febrero, se descubrió que el gobierno de Khan se reunió con el régimen de Putin para asegurar un acuerdo energético, a saber, un oleoducto, entre Rusia y Pakistán.

El acuerdo rumoreado fue recibido con una condena generalizada por parte de los miembros de la OTAN, activistas de derechos humanos, analistas de seguridad y otros, lo que obligó al acuerdo a prácticamente morir en el agua.

Un destino similar le espera a Bolivia si decide seguir adelante con este acuerdo. Bolivia se encontraría aislada de muchos socios clave en América Latina y Occidente, de los que depende gran parte de su prosperidad económica y desarrollo humano.

Bolivia también se vería amenazada por sanciones por apoyar tácitamente la guerra en Ucrania a través del acuerdo, ya que Rusia y sus patrocinadores financieros han recibido sanciones extensas y paralizantes.

Además, la candidatura podría tener repercusiones negativas para el papel de Bolivia en la lucha contra el cambio climático. Rusia tiene estándares y regulaciones ambientales más bajos para sus empresas. Donde Rusia ha manejado recursos energéticos, los incidentes ambientales han sido comunes.

Bolivia, especialmente bajo el liderazgo de Evo Morales y ahora Luis Arce, ha intentado posicionarse como un campeón de los derechos indígenas y ambientales. La retórica en torno a la guerra de licitación de la minería del litio ha sido similar, con el gobierno de Arce repetidamente citando públicamente la importancia del litio en la transición hacia futuros de energía renovable.

Si Rusia manejara la extracción de los recursos de litio de Bolivia, los estándares y regulaciones más bajos podrían resultar en un desastre ambiental. La tecnología que rodea la extracción de litio sigue siendo frágil, y Bolivia no debería escatimar esfuerzos eligiendo Uranium One/Rosatom.

A pesar del menor costo financiero que podría ofrecer, la oferta podría generar costos ambientales catastróficos a largo plazo.

Pozas de evaporación de litio en el Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Imagen de la NASA. Procesamiento de imágenes por Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay

También existen otros riesgos geopolíticos asociados con la oferta. En el pasado, Rusia no ha rehuído usar activos energéticos y mineros en todo el mundo para afirmar su dominio geopolítico.

Específicamente, Rusia ha amenazado con cortar o cortar por completo el suministro de energía y las actividades comerciales como una forma de ejercer presión sobre los estados que no cumplen.

En el período previo a la invasión de Ucrania, Rusia cortó el suministro de energía, incluida la electricidad, a algunos estados de Europa del Este como una demostración de fuerza contra la OTAN y para amenazar a esos estados con el cumplimiento. Rusia también cortó los flujos de gas natural a Finlandia en mayo después de que Finlandia se retirara del acuerdo de energía nuclear.

Si Bolivia acepta la oferta de Rusia, el gobierno de Arce corre el alto riesgo de que Rusia utilice su infraestructura de extracción como peón en un juego geopolítico por la hegemonía en América Latina. Tal riesgo se vuelve mayor a medida que las grandes potencias, a saber, Estados Unidos, China y Rusia, aumentan la competencia geopolítica en América Latina y en todo el Sur Global.

La mayoría de los bolivianos tampoco verían los beneficios de este acuerdo. Rusia es un estado cleptocrático, donde los directores ejecutivos de las empresas, principalmente en el sector de la energía, la minería y el ejército, son designados para puestos clave formales e informales en el gobierno.

El gobierno tiene una participación directa en estas empresas, y las figuras del gobierno se benefician de empresas comerciales estatales como Uranium One/Rosatom.

Vladimir Putin y sus compinches en el Kremlin serían los principales benefactores de este acuerdo, no el pueblo boliviano. El proyecto emplearía principalmente a rusos, no bolivianos, y, en la práctica, sería dirigido directamente por el Kremlin.

Los proyectos de energía y minería de Rusia en todo el mundo aportan poca actividad económica a las comunidades locales a las que impactan. En cambio, sirven como los proyectos favoritos y generadores de dinero de la élite en los pasillos del poder en Moscú, aumentando la brecha entre los pobres y los poderosos en Rusia.

Este posible acuerdo de litio con Rusia amenazaría el futuro de la democracia boliviana y los derechos humanos. La democracia de Bolivia es frágil.

En 2019, el país sufrió una crisis política marcada por un golpe de Estado de facto orquestado por la presidenta interina derechista Jeanine Añez. [Opinión de Bolivian Thoughts: Este es un gran error del autor de este comentario/artículo. Organismos multilaterales internacionales como ONU, OEA, UE y países como Colombia, EE.UU., no solo han reconocido la designación del Presidente Áñez como un gobierno constitucional, a raíz de que el expresidente huyó del país, acusado de fraude electoral, según lo visto y denunciado por los observadores de la OEA de las elecciones de 2019. El expresidente, un populista respaldado por cultivadores ilegales de hoja de coca, buscó asilo en México y luego en Argentina.] Afortunadamente, las elecciones de 2020 trajeron consigo una transición pacífica del poder y el retorno a un régimen constitucional y democrático. [Opinión de Bolivian Thoughts: Lo cual solo fue posible gracias al gobierno de la Presidente Áñez.]

Sin embargo, la historia de Bolivia ha estado marcada por una lucha de décadas entre la democracia y el régimen autoritario de la élite económica, política y militar del país.

Rusia, en sí misma un estado autoritario cleptocrático que trastorna las instituciones y los procesos democráticos liberales a nivel mundial, ya ha trastornado también la democracia boliviana.

Durante la Guerra Fría, Rusia respaldó a los grupos rebeldes comunistas autoritarios en Bolivia y América Latina en general. Más recientemente, Rusia ha enviado armas a regímenes autoritarios y grupos armados ilícitos, incluidos los regímenes de Cuba y Venezuela.

Si Rusia ganara este acuerdo, tendría mucho más poder, influencia y poder sobre la gobernabilidad y los derechos humanos en Bolivia, ya que controlaría el recurso natural más importante del país. Podría, entonces, amenazar la democracia boliviana desde adentro.

No vale la pena correr tal riesgo, especialmente dado el estado decrépito de la democracia global.

Lithium evaporation ponds in Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Source: NASA. Image processing by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay
Pozas de evaporación de litio en el Salar de Atacama, Antofagasta, Chile. Fuente: NASA. Procesamiento de imágenes por Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay

Es seguro decir que hay varias incertidumbres asociadas con el trato. Los riesgos para la democracia, los derechos humanos, la protección del medio ambiente y la estabilidad nacional-regional deben tomarse en serio.

Esos riesgos podrían ser peligrosos para Bolivia, ahuyentando la inversión económica en sectores comerciales adyacentes. Por lo tanto, sería lo mejor para el gobierno boliviano y su pueblo no continuar con el acuerdo de litio con Rusia.

En su lugar, debería invertir en una opción que ayude a que Bolivia sea más segura, más libre, más próspera y más verde, sin proporcionar cantidades indebidas de influencia a una gran potencia geopolíticamente ambiciosa como Rusia, que está sumergida en escándalos y violaciones de los mismos valores que debe promover el Estado boliviano.

Joseph Bouchard es un analista canadiense que se enfoca en geopolítica y seguridad en América Latina. Radicado en Bogotá, ha escrito anteriormente para The Diplomat, NATO, Spheres of Influence y City Paper Bogotá. También se desempeña como investigador del Programa de Seguridad Climática en el Instituto Igarapé en Río de Janeiro y candidato a la Maestría en Asuntos Internacionales en la Escuela de Gobierno Bush de la Universidad Texas A&M.

Published by Bolivian Thoughts

Senior managerial experience on sustainable development projects.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: