Daily Archives: May 29, 2019

Takesi, pre-Columbian jewel of Yanacachi

El Diario reports:

Tourism

  • The Takesi is one of the oldest routes left in Bolivia and dates back to pre-Inca times

The pre-Columbian Takesi road, treasure of Yanacachi in the south Yungas in La Paz, will be promoted soon by means of a plan promoted by the Tourism Promotion Committee of that municipality, the representative of the sector, Eduardo del Carpio, informed EL DIARIO.

“Takesi is the path of the Inca, part of the road network of Qhapaq Ñan that begins in Palca, passes through Yanacachi and the route continues like this,” he said.

The Takesi is one of the oldest routes left in Bolivia and dates back to pre-Inca times. Those who know the way speak of how wonderful the experience is in its cobblestone paths.

There are many tourism companies or organized groups that take walks through the Takesi; however, now it is the same community members who encourage tourists to take guided walks and with the attention of the residents. The project will be known in detail in the near future.

Carpio explained that the Tourism Promotion Committee of Yanacachi works on legal aspects, training, administrative functions, commercial and other aspects to achieve the tourism growth of this autonomous region.

He pointed out that, over the years, Yanacachi was growing and improving certain services such as health centers, tourism centers, churches, even working on a project of Calvary because the people of the region are of faith.

“Yanacachi in a tourist center and the conditions exist, there are banks, health centers, main point of the Takesi arrival, Calvary, there is a beautiful church, the people are very honest and the town is very quiet, picturesque, there are no liquor stores , discos, there are hotels that are already formed, there are business centers, places of food,” he added.

https://www.eldiario.net/noticias/2019/2019_05/nt190528/cultural.php?n=14&-takesi-joya-precolombina-de-yanacachi

Bolivian Thoughts opinion: I was particularly impressed by the last paragraph, I think is great that they can target to special tourism niche. To having express control on what they can offer, provides an advantage for those indigenous communities, they can tailor their tourism supply, while not going against their way of life. And only those tourist that enjoy under those conditions will tell others to go. It is sad that, for example, in the case of Samaipata, that it turned out to be an appendix of a common urban supply: booze, discos, ergo noise, potential criminality, etc. The people at Yanacachi know better!