An interesting article in The Economist about Bolivian Justice, January 2012

The Economist has written about Bolivia’s Justice, here is an excerpt but the link below will take you to the full story:

The justice system in Bolivia

Rough justice

The wrong way to reform the courts

Jan 7th 2012 | LA PAZ | from the print edition

IN THE streets of El Alto, Bolivia’s poorest and fastest-growing city, scarecrow dummies hang grotesquely from lampposts with ropes around their necks as a macabre warning to potential thieves and criminals. The threat is not idle. Residents have little faith in the police or the courts. Instead, they often take justice into their own hands: the lynching and killing of alleged offenders is not infrequent in El Alto, nor elsewhere in Bolivia.

The socialist government of President Evo Morales reckons that the way to restore public faith in the judicial system is to replace the judges with elected ones. On January 3rd, with much fanfare, he swore in 56 judges elected in a national ballot last October. They will now compose the country’s four highest courts.

Many rural Bolivians have no access to the courts. The new constitution drawn up by Mr Morales’s party and approved in 2009 has legalised traditional justice dispensed by village elders. Community justice can sometimes resemble legalised lynching, featuring stoning, strangulation or burning with petrol. The police do not keep separate records of these acts. Carlos Valverde, an investigative journalist, chronicled 16 such killings in 2009 and 13 in the first half of 2010, including the kidnap, torture and murder of four policemen.

Far from improving the quality of justice in Bolivia, Mr Morales’s reforms risk making it worse.

http://www.economist.com/node/21542421

About these ads

4 responses to “An interesting article in The Economist about Bolivian Justice, January 2012

  1. Good afternoon, thank you for a seriously enlightening blog post, I will not customarily
    submit comments but appreciated your weblog and so decided I
    would say thanks ! – – Scarlett

  2. I leave a response when I like a article on a website or if I have something to valuable to contribute to the discussion.
    Usually it’s triggered by the fire communicated in the article I looked at.
    And on this post An interesting article in The Economist about Bolivian Justice, January 2012
    | Bolivian Thoughts in an Emerging World. I was actually excited enough to leave a commenta
    response :-) I do have a couple of questions for you if it’s okay.
    Is it simply me or do some of the responses appear as if they are coming from brain dead visitors?
    :-P And, if you are writing on additional online sites, I would like to follow anything new you
    have to post. Could you list the complete urls of your communal
    pages like your linkedin profile, Facebook page or twitter feed?

    • Thank you for your contribution. You can follow me here as everything posted here appears in my FB account. Twitter is also linked to this site. Regarding the contribution of other people, I post everything people write back and only leave out spam or unrelated comments to the post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s